fuckyeahpikacha:

ohhhmagic:

"PUPPY"

This is the CUTEST minion short I’ve ever seen. It made my whole week <3

(via sovietboyfriend)

46,353 notes

mizoguchi:

The Israel-Gaza violence is visible from space

The fighting between Israel and Gaza-based Palestinian militant groups, now in its 15th day, is so severe that it is visible from space. A German astronaut on the International Space Station named Alexander Gerst, who has been posting photos on his Twitter account, posted this on Wednesday, in which he says the explosions of Israeli air strikes and Palestinian rockets are visible:

The photo is oriented such that north is to the right and south to the left; that dark area at the top is the Mediterranean Sea and the brightest spot, on the coast, is Tel Aviv. To the left of Tel Aviv, just 44 miles to the south, is Gaza City, the largest city in Gaza and the location of a lot of the worst fighting.

(via mysticalhorchata)

638 notes

Lykke Li - Gunshot (Demo)

lykkeli:

Lykke Li | Gunshot (Demo)

(via thatkindofwoman)

855 notes

#music: lykke li

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 
Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 
According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 
People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 
Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 

Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 

According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 

People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 

Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

(via katelucia)

1,343 notes

jt-hwabo:

Daniel Henney - 1st Look Korea (On Location)

(via typicrobots)

9 notes

#actor: Daniel Henney

Everything we do is a choice. Oatmeal or cereal. Highway or side streets. Kiss her or keep her. We make choices and we live with the consequences. If someone gets hurt along the way we ask for forgiveness. It’s the best anyone can do.

(via enclenque)

456 notes

#tv shows: pushing daisies

When you start to know someone, all their physical characteristics start to disappear. You begin to dwell in their energy, recognize the scent of their skin. You see only the essence of the person, not the shell. That’s why you can’t fall in love with beauty. You can lust after it, be infatuated by it, want to own it. You can love it with your eyes and your body but not your heart. And that’s why, when you really connect with a person’s inner self, any physical imperfections disappear, become irrelevant.

Lisa Unger, Beautiful Lies (via rapunzul)

(via absolutelyiris)

48,026 notes

thecutestofthecute:

Happiest puppies in the world

(via graceslicks)

213,461 notes

This is how you lose her.

You lose her when you forget to remember the little things that mean the world to her: the sincerity in a stranger’s voice during a trip to the grocery, the delight of finding something lost or forgotten like a sticker from when she was five, the selflessness of a child giving a part of his meal to another, the scent of new books in the store, the surprise short but honest notes she tucks in her journal and others you could only see if you look closely.

You must remember when she forgets.

You lose her when you don’t notice that she notices everything about you: your use of the proper punctuation that tells her continuation rather than finality, your silence when you’re about to ask a question but you think anything you’re about to say to her would be silly, your mindless humming when it is too quiet, your handwriting when you sign your name in blank sheets of paper, your muted laughter when you are trying to be polite, and more and more of what you are, which you don’t even know about yourself, because she pays attention.

She remembers when you forget.

You lose her for every second you make her feel less and less of the beauty that she is. When you make her feel that she is replaceable. She wants to feel cherished. When you make her feel that you are fleeting. She wants you to stay. When you make her feel inadequate. She wants to know that she is enough and she does not need to change for you, nor for anyone else because she is she and she is beautiful, kind and good.

You must learn her.

You must know the reason why she is silent. You must trace her weakest spots. You must write to her. You must remind her that you are there. You must know how long it takes for her to give up. You must be there to hold her when she is about to.

You must love her because many have tried and failed. And she wants to know that she is worthy to be loved, that she is worthy to be kept.

And, this is how you keep her.

This Is How You Lose Her, Junot Diaz (via thefairylights)

(via contrasts)

9,237 notes

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